Webinar: Increasing Health Care Access for Teens through Medicaid & CHIP (1/24/18)

Webinar: Increasing Health Care Access for Teens through Medicaid & CHIP (1/24/18)


>>Jason Werden
Welcome everyone to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid
Services Connecting Kids to Coverage National Campaign
Webinar on Increasing Health Care Access for Teens through
Medicaid and CHIP. We’ve had 592 people register
for today’s webinar, and we’re very excited about
the large group interested in this information and today’s
discussion and conversation. Again, I’m Jason Werden. I work closely with the
Connecting Kids to Coverage team at CMS to support education and
outreach efforts to all those eligible and encourage broader
enrollment to available health care coverage. Although teens are among the
healthiest population in the US, they are less likely to be
enrolled in health care coverage when compared to their
younger counterparts. Without coverage, many teens
often do not have access to vital health care services that
fit their specific needs, especially while they are
experiencing a period of physical and mental growth,
puberty, which can bring about developmental changes,
mental health challenges, and potential to engage
in risky behaviors. Medicaid and the Children’s
Health Insurance Program, better known as CHIP,
provide eligible teens up to age 19 with a foundation
for improved health outcomes now and for their future. Some groups are finding that
engaging teens in outreach and enrollment efforts not only
helps educate teens about program benefits, but it also
increases access to care. During our webinar
this afternoon, we will hear and learn from
national and local partner organizations as they share
their proven tactics and best practices they have used
to reach and enroll eligible teens in Medicaid and CHIP and,
beyond that enrollment, how they are also
educating in the same vein. We’ll provide tips and strategies to
develop successful partnerships with your local government and
local organizations to connect eligible children and
families to Medicaid and CHIP health coverage. Now as we go into the agenda,
let us review for today. Our speakers will cover
strategies for outreach and enrollment to teens across
the country and how to engage parents, teens, and members of
your community in your local efforts as you work
to enroll eligible teens. Our speakers will also share
some of their own experiences and best practices
as we mentioned to make health care enrollment
a community-wide effort. Our speakers today. We are very pleased to be joined
by Denise Daly Konrad with the Virginia
Health Care Foundation. She is the Director of Strategic
Initiatives and Policy. Virginia Health Care Foundation
is a public/private partnership dedicated to increasing access
to primary health care for uninsured Virginians and those
in underserved areas. Today, Denise will speak to how
we can actively promote teen enrollment in Medicaid
and CHIP programs, including a success story of
her own that she has experienced in the Commonwealth of Virginia. We will then hear from
Paula Keyes Kun, who is the Senior Advisor
to the CEO of SHAPE America, Society of Health
and Physical Educators. Paula will discuss how we can
increase the national dialog around important health topics
facing our adolescents, and how we can better approach
outreach and enrollment efforts in support of teen
health coverage. Society of Health and Physical
Educators is the nation’s largest membership organization
of health and physical education professionals,
defining excellence in phys ed since 1885. SHAPE America provides programs
and resources to support health and physical educators at every
level, and honors distinctive contributions across the profession
through their awards program. One of those distinguished honorees
is our third speaker today, Melanie Lynch,
who in 2016 was recognized by SHAPE America as
a National Teacher of the Year. Melanie is a career health educator
and published author of the instructive health textbook,
Comprehensive Health. She has also previously received
Teacher of the Year honors at the district and
state levels respectively. Melanie currently teaches
ninth and tenth graders in North Allegheny School District
in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania just north
of Pittsburgh. Today she will share how she is
successfully leveraging health and physical education to teach
and promote proper health literacy among teenagers in and
around her Pittsburgh community. Thank you again to all of our
speakers for joining us today. After these speakers
share their stories, we will then learn more about
the Connecting Kids to Coverage Campaign and resources
that are available to you. These are available to
strengthen your outreach and enrollment efforts to teens
locally as well as nationwide. All these materials shared
and discussed are available for direct download
and customization on InsureKidsNow.gov. Finally, we will wrap up
today’s webinar by addressing your questions. So please again, feel free
to use your chat box throughout the webinar to submit your
thoughts, questions, and connect with any
of our speakers. Now, as we begin we would like
to first pose two poll questions for our attendees today. Our first poll question asks,
how are you currently working to enroll teens in
Medicaid and CHIP? We appreciate your contributions
and your feedback today. We see that 65% of you are
in some capacity or another working to enroll teens
in Medicaid and CHIP. There are others that are not,
and there are still nearly 15%, 13% here, who are planning
to engage soon. That leads us into our next
poll question as a follow up, how are you currently enrolling
teens in Medicaid and CHIP? We have a selection
of options available to you, whether it be partnering
with other community initiatives, setting up tables at school
events or community engagement events, posting information on
social media, co-sponsoring local events with other organizations,
or altogether other options and opportunities in which you are
working or are planning to soon engage work to help with
outreach and enrollment efforts. Particularly for those
who have an “other” response, please share it
in our chat box feature. We would certainly love
to hear about the current activities you are
engaging in. And now for our responses. A wide variety of responses
here, which is great to see. We have individuals
who are partnering with their communities. We have others that are setting
up tables and pamphlets locally. Social media is of use,
as are co-sponsored events. The “Other” category is also
a large draw, and again we would love to hear more
about that following this webinar and through
our chat box feature. Now we would like to welcome
our first speaker today, Denise Daly Konrad. Denise again will be discussing
further how we can actively promote teen enrollment in
Medicaid and CHIP programs. Denise, thank you so much
for joining us today. The line is yours.>>Denise Daly Konrad
Thanks, Jason. We really appreciate
the opportunity to share what we’re doing to target
our outreach and enrollment efforts to teens in Virginia. At the Virginia Health
Care Foundation, we use a multipronged approach
to fulfill our mission of increasing access to primary
health care for uninsured and medically
underserved Virginians. We make grants to fund outreach
workers to help eligible children and pregnant women
enroll in state-sponsored health insurance through our Project
Connect grant program, and we employ an outreach worker
at the foundation who works locally
to identify and help families. We also make grants to health
safety net organizations that provide direct services
to uninsured and medically underserved Virginians like
FQHCs and free and charitable clinics and fund other initiatives that
support health safety net organizations. Next slide please. To give you a little bit of
background about children’s health insurance in Virginia,
participation in the FAMIS programs which include Medicaid
for children and CHIP is slightly lower than
the national average, 91.2% compared to
93.1% for the US. And as of 2015, participation
in state sponsored health insurance in contiguous states
is higher than both the Virginia and national rates,
ranging from a low of 94.1% in Maryland to a high of 98.6%
in the District of Columbia. We also know that 40% of
Virginia’s uninsured children are between the ages
of 13 and 18. This is the statistic
that helped us decide to focus efforts to reach
teens starting in 2015. Next slide please. As I mentioned a minute ago,
we refer to Medicaid for children, CHIP, and pregnant
women’s programs as the FAMIS programs in Virginia,
and I’ll use the term “FAMIS programs”
throughout my presentation. The foundation has several
initiatives that focus on increasing the number of
children and moms-to-be enrolled in
the FAMIS programs. As I mentioned,
we fund outreach workers and communities with high numbers
of income eligible children. These outreach workers work with
families to help them submit new or renewal applications for the
FAMIS programs and will support the family as its application
is under review by the local Department of Social Services
or Covered Virginia, with is a contractor
to our Medicaid agency. And we’ll help the family
respond to requests for more information and advocate for
the family if needed. We conduct trainings and provide
technical assistance and support to organizations that do
outreach and enrollment throughout the Commonwealth,
and we advocate for policy and program improvements
with state agencies. Next slide please. Our two primary child health
insurance initiatives are Sign Up Now and
Project Connect. Sign Up Now is a technical
assistance arm of our outreach and enrollment work,
and through that we conduct trainings throughout the year
on how to apply for the FAMIS programs
and conduct outreach effectively. We do three and a half hour
trainings in person throughout the Commonwealth. We have an on-demand
webinar on our website. We’ve prepared a detailed
toolkit on how to apply for the programs. We prepare
a quarterly newsletter. Since 1999, we’ve trained
over 11,000 people through the three and a half hour trainings
and the on-demand webinar. Project Connect is our direct
outreach and enrollment arm. We fund outreach workers today
in more than 20 Virginia localities with high numbers
of income eligible children. In addition to helping families
apply for insurance, our outreach workers also
participate in all kinds of events and cultivate key
organizational partnerships to raise awareness about the FAMIS
programs in their communities and their availability to help
provide application assistance. When it comes to enrolling
teens in the FAMIS programs, most of our outreach workers
have strong partnerships with their local school systems
and area nonprofits. Since 1999, our Project Connect
outreach workers have enrolled more than 95,000 children
and pregnant women in the FAMIS programs. Next slide please. In 2015, we started thinking
about special efforts to help reach teens to chip away at
the 39,000 kids 13-18 without health insurance in our state. We worked with the Department of
Education to design an outreach plan that ties FAMIS outreach
and enrollment to two activities teens like the best:
sports and driving. In thinking about how
to reach Virginia teens, we looked to the CMS Strategy
Guide, The Game Plan, and other efforts in place to
reach teens and their families. There really weren’t many,
really any, focused efforts to reach teens in Virginia. Schools are incredible outreach
and enrollment partners. Almost a third of all Project
Connect enrollments start with a referral from a school. For a number of years,
our state Medicaid agency has collaborated with our state
superintendent to send letters to local superintendents
with suggestions on how to raise awareness about the FAMIS
programs through existing school channels and to distribute
fliers that go to all Virginia public schools
at the start of each year. And most Project Connect
outreach over the years that is school focused has included
working with school nurses, social workers, guidance counselors,
and at registration times and back to school times. So we really needed some new
ideas to reach older kids, and we wanted to develop
approaches that didn’t require schools to provide personal
information to outreach workers so there wouldn’t be
any FERPA privacy concerns, which are often a barrier
to working with schools. We also wanted
to implement strategies that made sense year round. You will see that they do,
since students participate in summer school, many school
sports practice in the summer, and there are income eligible
kids in every school district and in every school. The initiatives we develop
complement the other efforts that are in place
and have strong support from the state superintendent. He appointed long time Principal Specialist for Health, Physical Education, Drivers’ Ed and Athletics
as our primary point of contact. Vanessa is also a long time
member of the Virginia High School League’s Board of
Directors and its Sports Medicine Committee. VHSL is the state organization
that sanctions school sports and other interscholastic
activities, so her dual role with the State Department of
Education and the VHSL has been extremely
helpful to us. Vanessa helped us develop our
strategy, vet our materials, and helped promote them with
the Department of Education, local school districts,
key professional associations, and The High School League. Next slide please. Our approach is more than
a marketing campaign. It provides resources and tools
to school faculty and staff who work closely with teens
and may know the student doesn’t have health insurance. So why did we develop
the approaches that we did? Well, they are affordable,
and we thought they’d resonate with teens, their families,
and school staff. They are simple in focus,
they were inexpensive. They focus on systemic change
that would reach students, faculty and staff. They are statewide
with a broad reach. We have clear support from the
State Department of Education and the High School League. They are consistent and build on
CMS’s The Game Plan. They complement existing
outreach underway in the state. And we really feel like health
insurance literacy is a critical life
skill for teens. Next slide please. In many Virginia localities,
the school district’s emergency care card includes information
about the FAMIS programs or provides consent to contact
the family if their child does not have insurance. As we were thinking about
reaching teens, we wondered if there might be
a similar document that we could include information
on about the FAMIS programs. It turns out, in Virginia,
any public school student who wants to play school-sanctioned
sports or participate in a number of other school activities
must have health insurance and must have a sports physical
using a standard form, which conveniently requires
the family to provide evidence the child has insurance. We worked closely with Vanessa at
the Department of Education, who was able to leverage her
relationship with the VHSL because VHSL is responsible for
the state sports physical form. She helped us navigate
the sports association to add language about
the FAMIS programs to the sports physical form. This is a form that is completed
for over 200,000 teen athletes in Virginia who participate in
the twenty-seven school sports that are available. The form is downloaded for use
from the VHSL website, so there were no copies to print
and it was easy to get the new version out to school districts
and prospective athletes when it was available. Next slide please. And you’ll see this is
a screen shot from the form, and that highlighted section in
the middle is where the person is supposed to provide the
health insurance information, and then underneath it on the
form it indicates how to contact the Covered Virginia call
center, which is the call center that the Department of Medical
Assistance runs for the FAMIS programs
and other benefit programs. We also worked closely with
Vanessa and her team to adapt our popular three and a half
hour Sign Up Now training to a thirty minute on-demand
webinar about the FAMIS programs and basics on how to apply. The webinar was designed for and
marketed to athletic trainers, administrators, coaches,
and other school folks. It includes links to the
Connecting Kids to Coverage Campaign materials, as well as materials
that we developed in house focusing on teens, sports,
and driving. The webinar is posted
on our website and the VHSL website and
those of other sports and related professional
associations in Virginia. We also wanted to find a way
to share information with teens themselves about
health insurance to include the FAMIS programs. We learned that ninth grade
Health and Physical Education is the only course that all the
Virginia public high school students are required to take,
so we developed lesson plans with in-class and homework
assignments for ninth grade health and PE and driver’s ed
teachers to use, and these lesson plans
are linked to the Virginia
standards of learning. The lesson plans are on our
website, and also on Health Smart Virginia, which is an
online compendium of health related lesson
plans for teachers. In the school districts
where there is a foundation funded outreach worker,
we are exchanging contact information between the outreach
worker and key school staff in the coming weeks to make sure
families in those communities have a contact person who can
help them either apply for the programs or
answer questions for them. Next slide please. We really like the Connecting
Kids to Coverage Campaign materials,
however we found that most of the photos on the materials
were of younger children. So we got permission from CMS
to develop similar materials using photos of teens. We’ve printed and will
distribute palm cards and posters with each outreach
worker’s contact information. So there is no expense
to the local school district to have teen focused
promotional materials available. We also developed versions of
the palm cards and posters that include the centralized state
call center phone number, so school districts in
localities where we don’t have an outreach worker can order
and use the materials as well. Next slide please. These are sample copies
of the materials. The far left is the palm card,
which is the size of a wrap card or a brochure. And then the two posters
on the right are 11 x 17. And they will be available
on our website shortly. Next slide please. This is a screenshot
of our website, where all the teen focused
outreach materials are found. Also, all of the Sign Up Now
materials that I mentioned, newsletters and the toolkit
and the on-demand webinar, are available on another
section of our website. Next slide please. I’d also like to take a minute
to share some best practices to engage families and encourage
enrollment with kids of all ages,
including teens. First, it’s important
to partner with agencies that are trusted by families. This helps facilitate access
to large groups of uninsured, income eligible children. It is important to show families
and teens that you have an interest in their health. We found it really valuable
to connect on the go with a mobile office. Our outreach workers
have laptops, portable scanners, hotspots and cell phones so they
can work just about anywhere, and they actually do. We’ve had applications completed
in McDonald’s parking lots, schools, high school games,
you name it, our outreach workers have probably
enrolled somebody there. It is also incredibly important
to hire the right people. Outreach workers need to be able
to connect with families of all kinds, and effectively
interact with state and local agency staff. So they need to be
accessible and professional. Other key attributes that make
a good outreach worker: somebody who is empathetic,
organized, politely persistent, creative, and respectful
is the perfect package. Next slide please. Our outreach workers also find
that families need someone who can help them overcome
language barriers, help complete long applications
and use technology. In Virginia, our renewal form
is 18 or more pages depending on
the family’s circumstances. They help in gathering
documentation, raising awareness about
the programs and eligibility requirements, educating families
about the value and importance of coverage for kids,
addressing families’ reluctance to seek help from
a government program, and making sure folks know that
this is not a welfare program but a health insurance program. And calming undocumented
parents’ worries about enrolling their US Citizen children
in the FAMIS programs. Next slide please. Please feel free to check out
our materials on our website or contact me with any questions. We’re really proud of the
strategies we’ve developed, and look forward to continuing
to promote them with teens, their families,
and school faculty and staff. We will also be adapting our
thirty minute webinar next month to make it more broadly relevant
to other school staff, and we’ll be marketing it
to other professional associations in Virginia. Thanks Jason again
for the opportunity.>>Jason Werden
Thank you Denise so much for all of that information and for that
connection back to the campaign. We would now like to introduce
to take it a bit further, to take our conversation
a bit further, Paula Keyes Kun. Paula is a Senior Advisor
to the CEO with SHAPE America. She’s here to discuss how
we can, again, increase dialog around a number of important health
issues and topics facing our adolescent audience
and successful measures that you can implement locally. Paula? Welcome.>>Paula Keyes Kun
Thanks, Jason. Today I’d like to talk to you
about SHAPE America. For those of you who might not
know, we’re the association formerly known as AAHPERD,
an alliance of five national associations that included
the American Association for Health Education,
The American Association for Physical Activity
and Recreation, the National Association for
Girls and Women in Sports, The National Association for
Sports and Physical Education, and The National
Dance Association. SHAPE America was founded
in 1885 as the Association for the Advancement
of Physical Education. William Gilbert Anderson,
a physical training instructor at Adelphi Academy,
had invited a group of people working in the gymnastics field
to come together to discuss the profession. At that time,
most members of our organization were physicians who had held
medical degrees. They certainly supported the
physical education movement because of the health benefits
that it could potentially have. Today, as in 1885,
we are a passionate and diverse group of health and physical
educators working together across this country. Our mission is to advance
professional practice and promote research related
to physical education and health education, physical
activity, sports, and dance. We share a common vision
to prepare all children to lead healthy and
physically active lives. Next slide please. Many of you probably know
that February is heart month. So please, make a visit
to our website and visit the Jump Rope for Heart and
the Hoops for Heart section. There you will find some
heart healthy resources. You will find activity ideas,
learn more about AEDs, and even learn how
to develop cardiac emergency response plans. We have a wonderful
Jump Rope for Hearts section all ready for you. Next please. Our “moonshot” goal is to reach
every one of our 50 million students across the country
through effective health and physical education programs. Our goal here with
50 Million Strong is that by the time today’s preschoolers
reach 18 years of age, we want them all to be
healthy and physically active. Next slide please. 50 Million Strong is our
commitment to put all children on the path to health and
physical literacy, as I said, through effective health and
physical education programs. On our website, we have case
studies of exemplary programs across the country. Next slide please. There we go. It’s all available, as I said,
at ShapeAmerica.org. We’d love to share
some of these great resources and materials with you. And here is an example
of our digital library that we have of classroom-ready,
teacher-friendly resources available for download. Our library includes information
on physical education and health education standards, posters,
advocacy, infographics, curriculum rubrics,
and lots of lesson plans. Ideas, we even have a monthly
calendar of physical activities. We’ve got e-learning guides
and many templates to use. In addition, all of our
materials are available in both English and Spanish. Next slide please. SHAPE America also provides
a wide variety of professional development, including
standards-based workshops, regular webinars, timely
podcasts, many conventions and conferences for the K-12
educators, college and university professors, coaches,
educators, and researchers. Next slide. Recognizing professional
excellence is certainly one of the most important things we do. All SHAPE America members
have the privilege of submitting nominees for our many
recognition awards, and then these awardees
are all honored at our national convention. One of the most prestigious
and long-standing of our awards programs is our Teacher
of the Year program. Teachers of the Year are
nominated from their states, then they go up through
our six districts, and finally at our national
convention we announce the six National Teachers of the Year
in adapted physical education, dance education,
health education, and the three levels
of physical education. These are truly the best
of the best of our educators across the country. Next. One of the, I now want
to introduce to you one of the most outstanding, truly,
health educators in the country. Her name is Melanie Lynch,
and Melanie is a past National Health Education
Teacher of the Year. She is going to share with you
a series of personal experiences regarding the importance
of education and enrolling teens in health coverage. Take it away, Melanie.>>Melanie Lynch
Thank you Paula so much, and thank you Jason for inviting
me to be a part of this webinar. Just a little bit
of my background. I am a Penn State grad. I had my undergrad and
my master’s degree there. I’m in my 22nd year teaching
health education, and my first year actually adding
physical education to that. After 21 years, I actually
uprooted from State College Pennsylvania and came
to the very prestigious school district of
North Allegheny. The reason I wanted to come
to North Allegheny is I knew they had an excellent program,
but a lot of times we run into roadblocks,
we as wellness educators and people who care about
children’s wellness. We find that sometimes at
the top with the budgets, and we’re some of
the first to get cut. And I wanted to come
to this school district, because from the top down,
they decided that wellness was going to be
their highest priority. So I thought to myself,
this is exactly where I want to be with
my passion and experience, and I want to learn from others. So I’m also the past president
of Pennsylvania State Association for Health,
Physical Education, Recreation and Dance,
which is kind of the state version of SHAPE America. And I’m also a proud
SHAPE America member. I’ve been involved
with the Alliance for Healthier Generations,
and co-authored the textbook Goodheart-Willcox
Comprehensive Health. I was an original HEAP trainer,
which stands for Health Education Assessment Project,
and that’s really what I’m going to talk about
a lot today of what kind of health lessons do we teach. Because as a lot of you on this
webinar, and I’m so excited to know that there were
592 people registered for this. But one of the things that
we as teachers have, is we have the target audience
that everybody wants. And that is not lost on me. So I realize that I have
the ears of these kids, and we get them every day,
and I just want to make sure that I do a great job
and collaborate with all types of wellness professionals
to do the best job I can to deliver what I need. Also, I’ve heard, Denise
mentioned Vanessa Wigand, who if you don’t know her
she is just an amazing wellness advocate. I’ve done some work with her
with the Department of Education writing skills based lessons,
and they are also on her website. So the thing that I think
we all have in common, is we all care about kids and
we care about their wellness. Obviously this
particular initiative is how to get them insured. And I think one of
the things we all have in common is that driving force. So I would say, something great
for all of you listening to think about is becoming
a member of SHAPE America. They do have digital
memberships, and there are
so many resources out there. And I sit on the Health Council,
and there are several different councils. It is just a think tank,
and there is production of project after project. Everything we do is to meet that
moon goal as Paula talked about, 50 Million Strong. That’s a lofty commitment,
but it’s a commitment that I think everybody
on this webinar is going to give
their best effort. Because that’s what
we do for a living. Can you go to
the next slide please? One of the things that
I’m working on is trying to debunk the health
teacher from yesteryear. I know my own health class
experience was basically, go to health class,
read the book, answer the questions,
go around the room, give the answers. Every couple of weeks
were tests. Really, it just is
not effective. All the research clearly states
that just because you know doesn’t mean
you’ll do. So SHAPE America came up with,
our council came up with, what is health literacy? And believe it or not, this took
a long time to process, because we wanted to make it
simple yet comprehensive. So health literacy is the
ability to access, understand, appraise, apply and advocate for
health information and services in order to maintain
or enhance one’s own health and the health of others. I do not teach content-based
health education. Because the content changes. Students have these devices
in their hands 24/7 where they can get the
majority of that content out. What I want to do is teach
skills, skills like self-management, goal setting,
accessing information. And I think accessing
information is the most applicable skill to be talking
about on this webinar. How do students know where to get
services they are lacking? If they need insurance,
how do they get insurance, where do they look. Also when they are looking up
information on the web, is it valid,
is it reliable. And these are skills
that once students have, as content comes and goes
from My Pyramid to My Plate and everything changes,
it doesn’t matter because these students will have the skills. And I have found these
statistics online, and it has really been
motivating me this year more than ever,
that 99% of Americans can read but only 12% are
health literate. That means that 88% of adults
out there, they don’t know how to access information,
they don’t know enough to know how to set good goals
or advocate for themselves. So that’s why SHAPE America
comes up with documents like best practices. If you really want to see
something truly amazing, go to our national convention,
I’m so excited to go to national this year. I’ve been to many organizations,
and the energy when you walk into a national convention where
every single person’s main goal is health and
wellness for kids, and you have
thousands of people. That energy is
the most amazing thing. So if you ever have a chance and
you want to become a member, that would be a perfect place
to check us all out. And it’s a great way to collaborate
with a lot of people, because as I said,
we have that target audience that a lot of you are trying
to run your programs through. Next slide please. Just to give you an idea of what
the difference is between content based and skills based. This is an activity that
I like to do with my students at the beginning of a semester. It is just giving them
a tiny little quiz, it’s not graded,
and it’s all content based. For example, some of
the questions are, getting 7-8 hours of sleep
every night is beneficial to your health,
and wearing seatbelts can greatly reduce
the risk of injury or death. And it’s all just about
what you know. And the students
take less than five minutes, they know all the answers are true. So if you go
to yesteryear’s health, you think as a health teacher,
I’m really doing something, all of my students
are knowledgeable, they’re ready to go out into
the world and they’re set. However, when you have
them actually take the health behavior quiz,
I turn my back, I say, everybody stand up,
and I go through each behavior that is linked to one of
the content knowledge. So for example,
I sleep 7-8 hours every night. If the answer is no
they have to sit down. I wear a seatbelt every single
time I’m in the car, again they say no
they have to sit down. By the time I get through the
eight behaviors and turn around, there is nobody standing. That’s the difference
between health knowledge and health behavior. So when we’re working on
those skills day in and day out in health education,
it really starts helping them master those skills
and become health literate. Next slide please. This is a great graphic
that we used for HEAP, the Health Education
Assessment Program. And it really shows
the complexity, that the core concepts
are the foundation. All of these students need
to have some kind of knowledge, they can’t just be lacking
any kind of real knowledge. I use the term “functional
knowledge,” what knowledge do they need to have
that’s at the tip of their tongues that they could
use to use those skills. For example, one of
the skills towards the top is IC,
Interpersonal Communication. We do a lot of role plays
and refusal skills. Somebody is trying to pressure
them into drinking alcohol, what content knowledge
do they need to have to make an argument? They don’t need to have
all the information, but what would be the best
information for them to have? So that’s why we have
to give some knowledge. If you also look off to the
left-hand side of the screen, if all you do is teach
health the way it was taught years and years ago, with just
the lecturing and tests, you’re going to see
that the health literacy is just extremely low. Then they don’t have the skills,
the tools to go get the services that they need. As they start getting the
skills, accessing information, they learn to analyze
influences, decision making, goal setting, interpersonal
communication. Notice the top two are the
highest level: self-management. For example, once
they get the insurance, do they take themselves
to the doctor? Do they go to the gym? Do they take
that content that they know and put it into practice? I think an even higher skill
that they have listed as an even skill is advocacy. Because once you’re doing
for yourself, I think the next level
is being passionate enough to advocate for change,
advocate for others to come on board and share
the wealth and get the experience
that you have. Also in this webinar I learned,
I like to do webinars outside of my normal realm,
that teenagers are the most underrepresented
as far as health care. And though they are
the healthiest, if you think about mental
health, their mental health is really struggling a lot these
days, and a lot of them don’t have access to care
because they don’t have any type of insurance. And so what we’re doing
in the classroom is trying to destigmatize mental
health issues and any kind of issues, whether it be
medical or emotional. And getting them to do that
self-management and getting to the doctor. Next slide please. So I really would like to thank
everybody for the opportunity that I had to come and share
my two cents on skills based health education and really
give a great big shout out for SHAPE America. Because as Paula had mentioned,
the website has just a plethora of resources,
and I know from being on the council that we are working
daily just to keep in mind what our population’s needs are,
communicating with other agencies, creating
new stuff all the time. So I once again want
to thank you for allowing me to be a part of this. Thank you Jason.>>Jason Werden
Melanie, thank you so much, and thank you to Paula as well. I would like to call out here
if you are interested in more information on SHAPE America,
you can get access to materials such as resources
and publications. The whole plethora of their
digital download library. Also look into professional
development opportunities such as those webinars,
online courses, and the new online institute. For more information as well
on 50 Million Strong and the Teacher of the Year Program
and the awards programs that were discussed. We invite you to visit
shapeamerica.org. And certainly do not forget that
their annual national convention and expo is occurring in a few
short weeks, March 20-24, in Nashville, Tennessee. You can also learn more about
engaging with attending and learning more about that expo
at shapeamerica.org. If you want to talk to Paula
directly, she’s also available. Thank you again Paula
so much for your time. She is available at
[email protected] Thank you Paula. We’d now like to share a bit
more information on the campaign resources that are available
through Connecting Kids to Coverage at a national level. We’re excited to begin
this new year, as we get into now February as well,
to reintroduce all of you to a number of resources that are
available through the campaign. You and your networks can use
these tools to help reach families and get children and teens
enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP in your community. We have a number of teen
specific outreach resources that are available. They are all available for
download and customization at insurekidsnow.gov. There are school-based outreach
and enrollment toolkits, outreach materials
specific for teens. We have brand new materials
with information such as 10 Things Schools Can Do,
a one pager with great information for use. Get Covered, Get in the Game,
a strategic guide to engaging and enrolling teen audiences. And a number of multimedia
materials at your disposal to use and disseminate
as you would like. We also have social graphics,
a number of templates, and again customization
is a piece that we really rely on you to make this unique
and your own in your community. You can find more on that
at insurekidsnow.gov. We also have television
and radio public service announcements, PSAs,
that are available to you. They were released last year,
and the Covered PSAs speak directly to parents. They highlight
the quality health coverage that is available for kids through
Medicaid and CHIP. These spots are available
in both English and Spanish, and can be downloaded from
the insurekidsnow.gov site. You can share these PSAs through
your social channels, play them on your public address
systems or in waiting rooms if you have that option
or capability, or even us a radio PSA as your
“on-hold” message by phone. We have more ideas for sharing
these PSAs in one of our resource materials,
10 Tips for Putting Public Service Announcements to Work. You can check all that out in
our Outreach Tool Library again available at insurekidsnow.gov. These PSAs, for your reference,
are good between now and June 11, 2019. We have even more additional
campaign materials beyond just those that are
specific to teen audiences. This is a recap of some
of those and extends beyond. Customizable posters,
palm cards, videos, tip sheets, informational webinars
such as this one which we thank you all for attending. Campaign Notes,
an eNewsletter where you can receive regular
communication from the campaign. We have ready-made articles and
radio scripts for your use. Digital media tools,
and again those PSAs are for your use at your disposal. There is a bit more on those
digital media tools as well. They include a Social Media
Graphics and Guides, web buttons and banners with
HTML code you can fold right into your sites respectively,
and sample posts that you can choose to use
particularly on Twitter. We recommend the #Enroll365. We also wanted to share here
just a quick look at other materials and topics that past
webinars have also covered and that customizable materials
are available for. The Connecting Kids to Coverage
Campaign materials cover an array of topics –
back-to-school, oral health, vision, teens as we are today,
sports, and of course year-round enrollment. All of these materials
are available for download on insurekidsnow.gov. As I mentioned,
all of these are customizable. You can take a look here
at how you can make these unique to your organization
and/or community. These are all available through
our Outreach Tool Library, and there are how-to guides
to ensure that you are accessing and using these materials to
the best of your ability. Our Outreach Tool Library
is, of course, available through insurekidsnow.gov. And you can take a look at past
webinars that we’ve had. Today’s is specific to teen
outreach, but we have done a number of webinars on similar
and related coverage, particularly most recently
School-Based Outreach and Strategies to Reach Medicaid
and CHIP-Eligible Students, and at the beginning of last
school year in September we held a webinar on Back-to-School
and School-Based Enrollment Strategies: Tried, True
and New Ideas to Reach Families. All of our prior webinars
are available at insurekidsnow.gov/webinars. Today’s webinar will also
be available as an archive in the coming weeks. We invite you to keep
in touch with the campaign in many capacities,
and we certainly would be interested in your follow up
to today’s webinar also. Follow us on Twitter @IKNGov. You can re-tweet,
share or tag messages using any of the following hashtags:
#Enroll365, #KidsEnroll, and #Medicaid and #CHIP. Certainly do sign up for the
Campaign Notes eNewsletter, there is a subscription button
at the top of the website. Email any of your questions,
comments, thoughts, or ways you wish to get involved. Email us directly at
[email protected] Now we want to know
what is working for you. We want to hear from you,
we want to know how your organization is planning to help
enroll teens in Medicaid and CHIP or how you’re doing so
on a regular basis now. We encourage you to reach out
to the campaign. Again, we provided the email
address, we welcome you to share your information and you have an
opportunity to share here today. We can share your questions. We have received
a few to this point. We’re going to pull them up now,
and we can run through a few. The first two questions
come from Dora. Dora, thank you
for reaching out. They are directed
to you, Denise, and the Virginia
Health Care Foundation. Dora asks, how are your
enrollments confirmed? And are they directly
connected to an in-person application assistant? Denise?>>Denise Daly Konrad
Sure, thanks, I’m happy to take those questions. I’m going to answer
the second one first. All of our enrollments
that I reported, the 95,000, are done by in-person assisters,
by outreach workers. But remember,
they have happened since 1999, so we have a lot of years
to enroll 95,000 children and moms. There are a couple of different
ways that our outreach workers confirm enrollment. They will ask a family
if the family has received a Notice of Action from the
Department of Social Services. Sometimes the outreach worker
has an arrangement with the Department of Social Services
to receive the Notices of Action directly, so a copy would go to
the family and a copy often goes to the outreach worker directly. And sometimes the outreach
worker will call the Department of Social Services worker who
has evaluated the individual family’s application and ask
whether or not the person or children have been enrolled. So we do verify
all of our enrollments. We also require all of our
outreach workers to use a database that we maintain,
and they are supposed to update it monthly with the applications
that they submit, and then they track the status
over the course of the time the application is under review. So we know if an application
is pending, if it has been approved
or if it has been denied. And for applications
that have been denied, they are supposed
to indicate what the reason was for the denial.>>Jason Werden
Thank you so much Denise. Our next question
is for Melanie. And one of our attendees asked,
I’m very interested in the stat you shared about
the 99% literacy, but only 12% being
health literate. Could you share
a little more about that, and where, if you could,
that stat came from?>>Melanie Lynch
I don’t have that right in front of me. That is from, I think,
I have that on one of my PowerPoints. That was on one of
the government sites. That goes back
to the skill, when you’re accessing
information. Jason, I can find that
and email it to you to post it. But it’s teaching kids,
when you are out there on a website and you see a stat,
how reliable or how valid is that. And I think this
was one of the government agencies and it had a .gov,
I’m sorry I don’t have that stat right up in front of me.>>Jason Werden
Thank you Melanie. And as noted, the stats Melanie
had previously shared on 99% literacy and
12% health literate, that is something that
we are going to provide as an after action on today’s
webinar and can include in an upcoming newsletter. So we certainly encourage you
to subscribe and follow Campaign Notes through the Connecting
Kids to Coverage Campaign. And there we are just about
up to the edge of our time available today. If you do have further questions
or wish to get in touch with the campaign, again,
we encourage you to email us at [email protected] And of course, do visit
insurekidsnow.gov to learn more about the campaign,
about our campaign partners who have joined us today,
and how you can get involved and begin using these materials
that are available to you today to further enroll teens
in health coverage in Medicaid and CHIP programs. We thank you
so much for joining, and have a great afternoon.

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